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13th COLOSS Conference, Athens

13th COLOSS Conference, Athens

* DATE: Thursday, November 02 – Friday, November 03 2017 * HOSTED BY: COLOSS * VENUE: Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, Athina 118 55, Greece *** CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW ***

VENUE

Agricultural University of Athens 
Iera Odos 75 
Athina 118 55, Greece
Link

DATES

Start:
Thursday, November 02
End:
Friday, November 03
2017

HOSTED BY

 

REGISTRATION

TERMS & CONDITIONS

Registration fee of € 40 (payable on site) will cover all coffee breaks, lunches, and the social dinner.

Due to limited financial support, participants will NOT be reimbursed for travel and accommodation.

Registration closes on: 05-10-2017

Registered Users: 43

Please login (or create an account) to sign up for this event.

DESCRIPTION

International meeting of COLOSS to provide an update on the network’s achievements and future directions, including meetings for Core Projects and Task Forces.

Annual General Assembly Meeting.

This conference is dedicated to Prof. Ingemar Fries. “Untimely loss of Ingemar Fries”

MAP

POSTER SESSION

Participants are invited to submit abstracts for a poster session prior to the social dinner. No submissions for oral presentations will be accepted.

All abstracts must be accompanied by a poster

Poster dimensions: no larger than A0 (84.1×118.9 cm)

If the first author is a student, please sign your poster as “Student poster”. The best poster by a student will receive the prestigious COLOSS award.

ACCOMODATION

We suggest the following hotels that are close to Syntagma Square and close to the historical centre of Athens. An offer exists, regarding the prices that it is possible to change depending on the availability of rooms.

You can address directly:

Electra Hotel: 5 Ermou str, 10563, Athens Greece: Reservations Tel: 210 3370100, E-mail: saleselath@electrahotels.grURL: www.electrahotels.gr

Electra Palace: 18-20 N. Nikodimou str, 10557, Athens Greece: Reservations Tel: 210 3370100, E-mail: salesepath@electrahotels.gr URL: www.electrahotels.gr

Electra Metropolis: 15 Mitropoleos str, 10557, Athens Greece: Reservations Tel: 210 3370100, E-mail: reservationsem@electrahotels.gr URL: www.electrahotels.gr

Refer to COLOSS CONFERENCE-AGRICULTURAL UNIVERSITY OF ATHENS.

Please take care to book on time for accommodation. Athens is overcrowded because of tourists and the events that are taking place during this period.

Room Rates (on BB Basis**)

Electra Hotel  Single € 115.00 Double € 145.00
Electra Palace Hotel Single € 140.00 Double € 160.00
Electra Metropolis Hotel  Single € 160.00 Double € 180.00

**The rates shown above are inclusive of American Buffet Breakfast & all taxes.

In case of any changes in the Greek taxiing policies, the rates will be adjusted accordingly.

Internet

Please note that Wi-Fi Internet access is offered free of charge in the meeting rooms and public areas of all these hotels. 

TRAVEL

Airport à Syntagma Metro Station: Metro Line 3, Airport to Syntagma Station, direction Agia Marina (cost of the ticket is 10 euros one way).

 Bus X95 SYNTAGMA – ATHENS AIRPORT EXPRESS. Direct Connection to Syntagma Square at Athens city center (the cost of the ticket is 6 euros one way). 

IMPORTANT NOTE: The bus is 24 hours/day but the last metro is on 23.30.

Public transport

The suggested Hotels: close to Syntagma Metro Station

Syntagma Metro Station à University: Metro Line 3, Syntagma Station to Station Keramikos, direction Agia Marina (2 STOPS), then 10 minutes walk to the University.

Athens Metro System

SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY – November 01, 2017

Session 1 – COLOSS Executive Committee Meeting 1 (for Executive Committee members only)

15:00-20:30

Meeting of the COLOSS Executive Committee at the Agricultural University of Athens.

SCHEDULE THURSDAY – November 02, 2017

Session 2 – COLOSS General Assembly Meeting 1

08.30-09.00

Sign-in & coffee

09.00-09.15

Welcome by COLOSS President and Local Organizing Committee Chair

09.15-10:30

General Assembly Discussions

10:30-11:00

Break, with drinks & snacks

Session 3 – COLOSS Updates

11:00-12:30

COLOSS Core Project & Task Force updates annual achievements (3 CPs & 8 TFs; 8 mins. ea.)

12:30-14:00

Lunch (covered) & poster set-up

Session 4 – Concurrent Discussion Groups 1

14:00-16:00

1. Monitoring, 2. Small Hive Beetle, 3. Vespa velutina

16:00-16:30

Break

Session 5 – Concurrent Discussion Groups 2

16:30-18:30

1. CSI Pollen, 2. B-RAP, 3. Bee Breeding

Session 6 – Posters & Social Dinner

18:30-20:00

Poster session with apéro

20:00-

Social dinner

SCHEDULE FRIDAY – November 03, 2017

Session 7 – Concurrent Discussion Groups 3

08:30-10:30

1. Varroa control, 2. APITOX, 3. Survivors

10:30-10:45

Break, with drinks & snacks

Session 8 – Concurrent Discussion Groups 4

10:45-12:45

1. B-RAP, 2. Viruses, 3. Varroa Control

12:45-14:30

Lunch

Session 9 – Concurrent Discussion Groups 5

14:30-16:30

1. APITOX, 2. Monitoring, 3. Bee Breeding

16:30-16:45

Short break

Session 9 – COLOSS General Assembly Meeting 2

16:45-17:45

Updates from Core Projects & Task Force discussions

17:45-18:30

Final General Assembly discussions, plans & Farewell

Session 10 – Executive Committee Meeting 2 (for Executive Committee members only)

20:00-21:00

Debrief meeting of the COLOSS Executive Committee

ORGANIZERS

Name: Aslı ÖZKIRIM
Institute: Hacettepe University
Phone: +90 312 297 80 43
E-mail:
Name: Maria Bouga
Institute: Agricultural University of Athens
Phone: +302105294564
E-mail:
Name: Geoff Williams
Institute: Auburn University
Phone: +1 334 329 8202
E-mail:
Name: Laetitia Papoutsis
Institute: Agricultural University of Athens
Phone: +302105294564
E-mail:

This event is supported by :

Participant # First Name Last Name Institution Email phone Presentation Type Social Dinner Food Restrictions
1 Peter Neumann Institute of Bee Health, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern peter.neumann@vetsuisse.unibe.ch +41 (0)31 631 57 67 Talk Yes None
2 Norman Carreck International Bee Research Association norman.carreck@btinternet.com +44 (0) 7918670169 Talk Yes None
3 Fanny Mondet INRA fanny.mondet@inra.fr 0033432722699 Talk Yes None
4 Maria Bouga Agricultural University of Athens mbouga@aua.gr +302105294564 Talk Yes None
5 BULET Philippe BioPark Archamps philippe.bulet@biopark-archamps.org +33450432521 Talk Yes None
6 Michel Bocquet Michel Bocquet Consulting, personal entrerprise apimedia@aol.com +33 608 10 62 28 Poster Yes None
7 Rosa Maria Licón proApia romaliconluna@live.com + 33 676822406 Poster Yes Vegetarian
8 Nikolaos Emmanouil Agricultural University of Athens ceaz2emn@aua.gr +302105294575 Talk Yes None
9 Flemming Vejsnæs Danish Beekeepers Association fv@biavl.dk 0045 57865470 Talk Yes None
10 Anne DALMON INRA anne.dalmon@inra.fr +33 4 32 72 26 27 Talk Yes None
11 Laetitia Papoutsis Agricultural University of Athens papoutsilaetitia@aua.gr 2105294564 Talk Yes None
12 Geoff Williams Auburn University williams@auburn.edu 334-844-5068 None Yes None
13 Aneta Ptaszyńska Maria Curie-Sklodowska University anetaptas@wp.pl 605266627 None Yes None
14 Per Kryger Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology per.kryger@agro.au.dk 004561153629 None Yes None
15 Bjørn Dahle Norwegian Beekeepers Association bjorn@norbi.no +47 94783374 None Yes None
16 Vincent Dietemann Agroscope vincent.dietemann@agroscope.admin.ch +41 (0)58 463 82 04 None Yes None
17 Michail Kokkinis Veterinary Centre of Thessaloniki mixkok@vet.auth.gr +2310566060, +6974816741 None Yes None
18 RAQUEL MARTIN Centro de Investigación Apícola y Agroambiental de Marchamalo (IRIAF) rmhernandez@jccm.es +34949885014 None Yes None
19 Marco Pietropaoli Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Lazio e della Toscana marco.pietropaoli@izslt.it +39 0679099328 Poster Yes None
20 Patricia Aldea Universidad Mayor patricia.aldea@mayor.cl +56944491435 Poster Yes None
21 Aranzazu Meana Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid ameana@ucm.es +34913943903 None Yes None
22 Maritta Martikkala Finnish Beekeepers Association maritta.martikkala@hunaja.net +358503030890 None Yes None
23 Raffaele Dall'Olio BeeSources raffaele.dallolio@gmail.com +393747687857 None Yes None
24 Maja Ivana Smodiš Škerl Agricultural institute of Slovenia maja.smodis.skerl@kis.si 0038612805150 Poster Yes None
25 Javaid Iqbal King Saud University, Riyadh javaid.uds@gmail.com +966114678422 Poster Yes Halal
26 Robert Brodschneider University of Graz robert.brodschneider@uni-graz.at 00433163805602 None Yes None
27 Jevrosima Stevanovic Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade rocky@vet.bg.ac.rs +38162226410 None Yes None
28 Ivana Tlak Gajger University of Zagreb Veterinary Faculty ivana.tlak@vef.hr 00385912390041 Poster Yes None
29 Andrzej Bober National Veterinary Research Institute andrzej.bober@piwet.pulawy.pl +48 691 141 156 Poster Yes None
30 Marina Kosanovic veterinary faculty marinakosanovic11@gmail.com 00385997687239 None Yes None
31 Linde Morawetz Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety linde.morawetz@ages.at +43-50555-33120 Poster Yes None
32 Eva Forsgren Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences eva.forsgren@slu.se +4618672083 None Yes None
33 Barbara Locke Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences barbara.locke@slu.se 018 None Yes Vegetarian
34 Pike Brown Landcare Research brownp@landcareresearch.co.nz +6433219809 Poster Yes None
35 Ulrike Marsky Véto-Pharma ulrike.marsky@vetopharma.com 00491747860384 None Yes None
36 ASLI ÖZKIRIM HACETTEPE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY ozkirim@hacettepe.edu.tr 5333269713 None Yes None
37 Remi PADE Veto-pharma remi.pade@vetopharma.com +33 1 69 18 84 86 None Yes None
38 Declan Schroeder University of Reading dsch@mba.ac.uk 07848457054 None Yes None
39 ole kilpinen Danish Beekeepers Association olek@biavl.dk +45 23323760 None Yes None
40 Joachim Rodrigues de Miranda Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences joachim.de.miranda@slu.se +4618672437 None Yes None
41 Dirk de Graaf Ghent University dirk.degraaf@ugent.be +32 9 264 8732 Poster Yes None
42 Daniela Laurino Università degli Studi di Torino daniela.laurino@unito.it 0039 011 670 8525 None Yes None
43 Aulo Manino University of Turin_DISAFA aulo.manino@unito.it +390116708669 None Yes None

Abstract Title:

Introduction

Submitted by:

Peter Neumann

Institution:

Institute of Bee Health, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:

Overview of event and COLOSS activitites


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Norman Carreck

Institution:

International Bee Research Association

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Fanny Mondet

Institution:

INRA

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Maria Bouga

Institution:

Agricultural University of Athens

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Identifying stressors and effectors of the honeybee immune response, through mass spectrometry, may represent a promising solution for bee health monitoring

Submitted by:

BULET Philippe

Institution:

BioPark Archamps

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:

In recent years, populations of western honeybees have declined worldwide. This decline is attributed to many stressors. Up to today, research and methodologies deployed against new challenges (such as use of pesticides, virus prevalence and other pathogens, climate and flora changes) have focused on evaluating and attempting to separately prevent and fight each factor. In addition, most of studies have focused on identifying and quantifying the presence of stress agents, instead of focusing on their impact on the colonies. The aim of our studies is to address these limitations by establishing robust, effective and sensitive technologies for profiling & deciphering bee immunoproteomes with regards to the host-pathogen interactions. The objective is to deliver practical applications for monitoring and enhance bee immunity for an integrated and adapted health management. The analyses of bee hemolymph, by hyphenated MALDI-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS approaches for proteomic characterization of the immunoproteomes, resulted in visually different molecular profiles in function of the bees’ infectious conditions (virus, Varroa mite, microsporidia Nosema). These differences were confirmed by statistical comparison of mass spectrometry profiles and discriminant analysis. We have demonstrated for example that virus-infected bees samples, with or without Varroa co-infection, ended up in a cluster of their own inside the overall Varroa cluster. This strongly supports the robustness of our monitoring approach in the case of co-infections, its potential as a plausible strategy to monitor honeybees’ health, and for a better understanding of the molecular immune response of this social insect, in the context of experimental/natural infections.


Abstract Title:

BeeTyping™, a Biotyping-like mass spectrometry approach for bee health monitoring

Submitted by:

Michel Bocquet

Institution:

Michel Bocquet Consulting, personal entrerprise

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:

Honeybee population decline is being attributed to stressors such as parasites (viruses, Varroa mite), pesticides, and environmental changes. Most researches focused on identifying the stressors’ presence instead of their impact on honeybee colonies. BeeTyping™ aims at profiling the infected bees’ immunoproteome, in order to deliver practical applications for bee health management. Hemolymph samples were collected from individuals from monitored colonies with a diagnosed infection, and from individuals artificially infected with a pathogen. Virus presence was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Protein content was analyzed and compared by MALDI-MS, directly or after reduction-alkylation of the hemolymph. Top-down analysis by LC-MS/MS was conducted to confirm protein identities. Hemolymph analyses tracked key peptides and proteins of the bee immunoproteome (apidaecin, hymenoptaecin…), and resulted in different molecular fingerprints in function of the bees’ infectious conditions. These differences were confirmed by statistical comparison of MS profiles by principal component analysis. Virus-infected bee, with or without Varroa destructor co-infection, ended up in a cluster of their own inside the overall Varroa cluster. These first results strongly support the robustness of our monitoring approach in the case of co-infections, its potential as a plausible strategy to monitor honeybees’ health, and a mean for a better understanding of the molecular immune response of this social insect, in both experimental and natural infections. Other infection models are currently being investigated, notably for microsporidia (Nosema) and entomobacteria.


Abstract Title:

Heat and ozone in beekeeping

Submitted by:

Rosa Maria Licón

Institution:

proApia

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:

In preparation


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Nikolaos Emmanouil

Institution:

Agricultural University of Athens

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Flemming Vejsnæs

Institution:

Danish Beekeepers Association

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Virus Taskforce

Submitted by:

Anne DALMON

Institution:

INRA

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Laetitia Papoutsis

Institution:

Agricultural University of Athens

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Geoff Williams

Institution:

Auburn University

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Aneta Ptaszyńska

Institution:

Maria Curie-Sklodowska University

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Per Kryger

Institution:

Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Bjørn Dahle

Institution:

Norwegian Beekeepers Association

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Vincent Dietemann

Institution:

Agroscope

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Michail Kokkinis

Institution:

Veterinary Centre of Thessaloniki

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

RAQUEL MARTIN

Institution:

Centro de Investigación Apícola y Agroambiental de Marchamalo (IRIAF)

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Marco Pietropaoli

Institution:

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale del Lazio e della Toscana

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Caging queens and oxalic acid against Varroa mite in Chile

Submitted by:

Patricia Aldea

Institution:

Universidad Mayor

Abstract Authors:

Aldea P., Duran N., Henríquez P., and Blaauboer F.

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Aranzazu Meana

Institution:

Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Maritta Martikkala

Institution:

Finnish Beekeepers Association

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Raffaele Dall'Olio

Institution:

BeeSources

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

New Frontiers in Varroa Control – Are HBAs an Effective Treatment Against Varroosis?

Submitted by:

Maja Ivana Smodiš Škerl

Institution:

Agricultural institute of Slovenia

Abstract Authors:

Maja Ivana SMODIŠ ŠKERL, Jernej BUBNIČ, Vlasta JENČIČ, Andreja KANDOLF BOROVŠAK, Iztok Jože KOŠIR, Peter KOZMUS, Miha OCVIRK, Metka PISLAK OCEPEK, Janez PREŠERN, Stanko SRČIČ

Abstract:

In recent years, a tendency of increased use of organic products for varroa control is present. There are some preparations known and registered for organic repression on the base of plant extracts. Recently, products based on hop beta-acids (HBA) are offered as an alternative, since they are perceived as harmless, naturally occurring in the environment and consequently their maximum residue limits (MRLs) are set as not relevant. An important industry in Slovenian agriculture is also hop growing, which annually produces 2,500 t of hops and hop products, which ranks Slovenia in the 5th place in the world with 3% of world production. Consequently hop industry is always looking for alternative uses for hops outside the brewing industry. In addition to the role of the hops in beer as a raw material, which gives beer flavour and aroma, it is very important also the role of a preservative, because beer is one of the rare drinks with no addition of preservatives. In beer HBAs have a protective role with a proven antimicrobial effect. In our experiment we carried out practical testing of hops extracts in the form of toxicity tests on varroa infested bees at different concentrations and with different methods of application. We evaluated the effects of hop extracts on the cleaning behaviour of bees. Moreover, a pilot trial on colonies was carried out taking into account the environmental factors that may affect the condition of the colony. After conducting a pilot experiment, sensory evaluation of honey will be performed in order to determine the possible transition of hop components in honey, and possible impact to sensorial properties. The completion of this research will be a prototype product based on beta-acids on which stability tests in laboratory environment will be conducted. From existing gene banks of standard varieties and collections of new hop breeding lines we will search for suitable hop genotypes. We will determine the content of alpha- and beta-acids, and the quantity and composition of essential oils. Based on the results we will create a list of prospective genotypes suitable for cultivation for the purpose of extracting beta-acids. In commercially available hop extracts we will further determine their chemical composition of hop resins and essential oils, as a potential disruptive element.


Abstract Title:

Learning potential of indigenous bee race of Saudi Arabia in comparison with exotic races

Submitted by:

Javaid Iqbal

Institution:

King Saud University, Riyadh

Abstract Authors:

Javaid Iqbal, Abdulaziz S. Alqarni

Abstract:

In Preparation


Abstract Title:

Current and planned activities and reach of the monitoring group

Submitted by:

Robert Brodschneider

Institution:

University of Graz

Abstract Authors:

Alison Gray, Robert Brodschneider

Abstract:

An ongoing goal of the monitoring group is to expand the representation of countries participating in the group for a better overview of colony loss rates, and the group continues to be active in recruiting new contacts with potential to run their own national surveys. In 2017, 30 countries sent data from their monitoring survey to the international data co-ordinator for inclusion in the data analysis, a net increase of 1 country on last year. In fact data was received from Malta, Mexico and Serbia, as new countries to the monitoring group, and Belarus joined in once more, having taken part in 2015. Portugal has started monitoring but, owing to some local delays, their survey is in progress at the time of writing. We hope that it may be possible to include these data in a later analysis. Romania, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina (a previous participant), Greece, Luxemburg and Armenia were also possibilities for monitoring, and remain so for next year. However as new countries join in, others are sometimes unable to continue. Some countries participating last time did not send data this year. Of those countries Turkey took part in 2016 after a break of a few years, but was unable to contribute in 2017. Lithuania had some difficulties with data return in 2016 and did not contribute at all this year. The Netherlands did not monitor this year, but has been a key contributor of data every year since the beginning of the monitoring group. Indeed Romee van der Zee has contributed enormously to the work of COLOSS. We greatly appreciate Romee’s past contributions as chair and data co-ordinator of the monitoring group until recent years, and also her ongoing work in writing some of our planned papers with data collected so far. She will also act as a consultant to the group. Concerning data quality, this remains an issue that hinders some of the analysis and limits the usefulness of some of the data collected. Special efforts were made to emphasise the importance of submitted data passing quality checks, through email communication, presentations, and also by including instructions to national co-ordinators as part of the codebook provided for data return. Despite this, some datasets did not comply with the coding rules, which delays analysis, and not all cases are useable owing to missing or inconsistent data. Disappointingly, for one country most of the data for some essential questions was missing. More support may be needed for new countries, but some more established contributors need to focus on these issues. Providing the codebook earlier and/or collaboration at the point of design of the local questionnaire and instructions to beekeepers may be necessary to reduce the problems encountered this year. A move towards more countries collecting data online may be helpful, for ease of access to the questionnaire and return of data by the beekeeper, as well as building in data consistency and quality checks. This will also allow new countries with widespread computer use to join in monitoring more easily with the support of those already doing online surveys. We hope to revisit the issues of the hot countries, in Africa and the Middle East, to give more support in several ways to our existing and former partners there and to recruit new ones. Connected to this is a new contact with Argentina and the participation this year of Mexico. Following the new initiative started in 2016 to submit an annual short paper on winter loss rates before more in-depth analysis, the second of this series of papers has just been submitted. This will be followed up with a press release at the time of publication, expected by the end of 2017, as a change to the usual timing of this. A further plan is to write a descriptive study of Varroa treatments in Europe and this is underway at the time of writing. Two other planned papers are still in production, with further possibilities for publication in mind also. A priority is a review of winter loss rates to examine spatio-temporal patterns.


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Jevrosima Stevanovic

Institution:

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Belgrade

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Ivana Tlak Gajger

Institution:

University of Zagreb Veterinary Faculty

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF NOSEMA CERANAE PRESENT IN POLAND

Submitted by:

Andrzej Bober

Institution:

National Veterinary Research Institute

Abstract Authors:

Andrzej Bober, Dagmara Zdańska, Marta Skubida, Krystyna Pohorecka

Abstract:

The aim of the study was to assess the phylogenetic diversity of Nosema ceranae strains and potential routes of introduction of the parasite to national apiaries. Polish isolates and isolates occurring in other countries were compared to obtain this aim. The research material comprised of samples of worker bees collected from individual colonies, originating from apiaries located in 16 provinces. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships 3 samples with N. ceranae from different apiaries in each province were taken. In order to obtain DNA fragments (of the genes encoding polar tube proteins - PTP1, PTP2, PTP3) phylogenetic analysis was performed after a PCR using 4 primer pairs for each sample (for PTP1 gene 2 primer pairs were used). Analyses set up for the phylogenetic tree for PTP2 gene sequence and PTP3 gene sequence revealed the presence of one main group with the tendency to form subgroups for both the PTP2 gene and the PTP3 gene. Based on a comparison of genetic distances between the isolates we demonstrated very high similarity to the reference sequences for both fragments of analyzed genes.


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Marina Kosanovic

Institution:

veterinary faculty

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

„Varroawarndienst“ - a beekeepers’ Citizen Science project to support the control of Varroa mites

Submitted by:

Linde Morawetz

Institution:

Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety

Abstract Authors:

Linde Morawetz, Josef Mayr, Rudolf Moosbeckhofer, Michael Rubinigg

Abstract:

The negative effects of the infestation with Varroa destructor is one of the major problems of modern beekeeping. Despite intensified training and regular information campaigns, Austrian beekeepers keep struggling with severe winter losses due to the Varroa mite. The “Varroawarndienst” (Varroa warning service) is a new approach, which aims to raise awareness of the Varroa problem and gives active advise to beekeepers to take action in situations of high Varroa infestation rates. In this Citizen Science project beekeepers are invited to share their data on Varroa infestation levels in their own colonies with all other beekeepers in Austria. They systematically sample natural mite fall (five times a year, each time for one week) and submit the collected data via a web-browser to a database where the data is analysed. In addition, the exact location of the apiary, from which the data was collected, is submitted. In return, they are provided with useful tools which evaluate the current state and development of Varroa infestation level of the beekeeper’s own colonies. Each beekeeper visiting the platform gets an overview of the current situation of Varroa infestation in Austria. A classic traffic light design helps to catch the overall situation at one glance. Furthermore, visitors are provided with a detailed prediction of the expected development of the Varroa infestation level and of the situation in various regions of Austria. Information of high infestation levels in their regions will shift their attention towards early signs of Varroosis or reinfestation in their own colonies. A weather forecast is also implemented into the platform, which helps to find the ideal date or period for each particular type of Varroa treatment. Therefore, beekeepers can react in time and efficiently to the current situation and the probability that the bee colonies will survive the forthcoming winter is increased.


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Eva Forsgren

Institution:

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Barbara Locke

Institution:

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Winter 2016 Honey Bee Colony Losses in New Zealand

Submitted by:

Pike Brown

Institution:

Landcare Research

Abstract Authors:

Pike Brown, Linda Newstrom-Lloyd, Barry Foster, Paul Badger, John McLean

Abstract:

Estimating winter losses for managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies is critical for understanding hive productivity and health. This study reports estimates of overwinter colony losses in New Zealand, which has seen exponential growth in the number of managed colonies in recent years. Over 35% of all beekeepers and 50% of all commercial beekeepers in the country responded to the internet-based 2016 New Zealand Colony Loss Survey, providing detailed information on over 275,000 colonies (over 40% of all registered colonies) that entered winter 2016. Using three different methods, we estimate overall winter losses to be below 10%. However, nearly 29% of beekeepers lost more than 15% of their colonies over winter 2016, and nearly 25% of beekeepers lost more than 20% of their colonies over winter 2016, indicating considerable skewness. These results are subject to strong regional variation, with the highest losses reported in areas with significant mānuka resources; similarly, non-commercial beekeepers report substantially higher losses than commercial beekeepers. Beekeepers who lost colonies over the winter of 2016 most frequently attributed the cause to colony death, queen problems, or wasps. However, varroa and competition for apiary sites were also identified as important areas of concern.


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Ulrike Marsky

Institution:

Véto-Pharma

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

ASLI ÖZKIRIM

Institution:

HACETTEPE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Remi PADE

Institution:

Veto-pharma

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Declan Schroeder

Institution:

University of Reading

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

ole kilpinen

Institution:

Danish Beekeepers Association

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Joachim Rodrigues de Miranda

Institution:

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Abstract Authors:

Abstract:


Abstract Title:

KEEP CALM - IT'S ONLY 365 DAYS UNTIL EURBEE8

Submitted by:

Dirk de Graaf

Institution:

Ghent University

Abstract Authors:

Dirk C. de Graaf

Abstract:

We are pleased to announce the 8th EurBee Congress of Apidology, to be held in Ghent, Belgium, September 18 – 20, 2018. This meeting follows the Eurbee congresses in Udine, Prague, Belfast, Ankara, Halle, Murcia, and Cluj Napoca. The EurBee congresses are held every two years and are a major international forum for discussion of the latest and most important results in bee research. The meetings bring together scientists from different fields and serve as a venue for exchanging ideas that emerge from basic and applied research. EurBee has become the premier event for researchers studying different aspects of wild and managed bees, and how they respond to environmental changes to address problems with species conservation, pollination services, beekeeping management and colony losses. The venue of Eurbee8 is the Campus Ledeganck of Ghent University, which is located near the historic centre of Ghent, a medieval city in the heart of Europe. More detailed information on deadlines for paper submission, registration and accommodation is available on the congress website: http://www.eurbee2018.org/


Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Daniela Laurino

Institution:

Università degli Studi di Torino

Abstract Authors:

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Abstract Title:

Submitted by:

Aulo Manino

Institution:

University of Turin_DISAFA

Abstract Authors:

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